List of past AFCON winners, host countries, coaches from 1957 till date

List of past AFCON winners, host countries, coaches from 1957 till date
Credit: Icon sport

The Africa Cup of Nations (AFCON) stands as a testament to the rich history and passion for football across the African continent. Since its inception in 1957, this prestigious tournament has witnessed remarkable moments, fierce competition, and the crowning of champions who have left an indelible mark on the sport.

In this journey through time, we explore the list of past AFCON winners, the host countries that have played a pivotal role in showcasing the tournament, and the revered coaches who guided their teams to glory from 1957 to the present day.

Join us in unraveling the tapestry of African football excellence as we delve into the annals of AFCON history.

List of past AFCON winners

IMG 20231231 WA00051
Credit: Icon Sport

Explore the illustrious history of AFCON with our comprehensive list of past AFCON winners.

From the powerhouse performances of teams like Egypt, Cameroon, Ghana, and Nigeria to the historic triumphs of Ivory Coast, Algeria, and other nations, this curated compilation details the winners and runners-up, showcasing the rich legacy of African football.

Team Winners Runners-up Total Finals Years Won Years Runners-up
Egypt 7 3 10 1957, 1959, 1986, 1998, 2006, 2008, 2010 1962, 2017, 2021
Cameroon 5 2 7 1984, 1988, 2000, 2002, 2017 1986, 2008
Ghana 4 5 9 1963, 1965, 1978, 1982 1968, 1970, 1992, 2010, 2015
Nigeria 3 4 7 1980, 1994, 2013 1984, 1988, 1990, 2000
Ivory Coast 2 2 4 1992, 2015 2006, 2012
Algeria 2 1 3 1990, 2019 1980
DR Congo 2 0 2 1968, 1974
Zambia 1 2 3 2012 1974, 1994
Tunisia 1 2 3 2004 1965, 1996
Sudan 1 2 3 1970 1959, 1963
Senegal 1 2 3 2021 2002, 2019
Ethiopia 1 1 2 1962 1957
Morocco 1 1 2 1976 2004
South Africa 1 1 2 1996 1998
Congo 1 0 1 1972

African Cup of Nations hosts through the years

Explore the historical journey of the African Cup of Nations host countries, spanning from the inaugural tournament in Sudan in 1957 to the upcoming event slated for Ivory Coast in 2024.

Year Host Country
1957 Sudan
1959 Egypt
1962 Ethiopia
1963 Ghana
1965 Tunisia
1968 Ethiopia
1970 Sudan
1972 Cameroon
1974 Egypt
1976 Ethiopia
1978 Ghana
1980 Nigeria
1982 Libya
1984 Ivory Coast
1986 Egypt
1988 Morocco
1990 Algeria
1992 Senegal
1994 Tunisia
1996 South Africa
1998 Burkina Faso
2000 Ghana/Nigeria
2002 Mali
2004 Tunisia
2006 Egypt
2008 Ghana
2010 Angola
2012 Equatorial Guinea/Gabon
2013 South Africa
2015 Equatorial Guinea
2017 Gabon
2019 Egypt
2022 Cameroon
2024 Ivory Coast
2025 Morocco (Selected)
2027 Kenya/Tanzania/Uganda (Selected)

A chronology of coaches leading nations to glory from 1957 to 2021

Year Country Coach
1957 Egypt Mourad Fahmy
1959 Egypt Josef Titkos (Hungary)
1962 Ethiopia Slavko Milosevic (Yugoslavia)
1963 Ghana Charles Gyamfi
1965 Ghana Charles Gyamfi
1968 Congo-Kinshasa Ferenc Csandai (Hungary)
1970 Sudan Abdelfattah Hamad
1972 Congo Adolph Bibanzulu
1974 Zaire Blagoje Vidinic (Yugoslavia)
1976 Morocco Gheorge Mardarescu (Romania)
1978 Ghana Fred Osam Duodu
1980 Nigeria Otto Gloria (Brazil)
1982 Ghana Charles Gyamfi
1984 Cameroon Rade Onganovic (Yugoslavia)
1986 Egypt Mike Smith (Wales)
1988 Cameroon Claude Le Roy (France)
1990 Algeria Abdelhamid Kermali
1992 Cote d'Ivoire Martial Yeo
1994 Nigeria Clemens Westerhof (Netherlands)
1996 South Africa Clive Barker
1998 Egypt Mohamed Al Gohari
2000 Cameroon Pierre Lechantre (France)
2002 Cameroon Winfried Schafer (Germany)
2004 Tunisia Roger Lemerre (France)
2006 Egypt Hassan Shehata
2008 Egypt Hassan Shehata
2010 Egypt Hassan Shehata
2012 Zambia Herve Renard (France)
2013 Nigeria Stephen Keshi
2015 Ivory Coast Herve Renard (France)
2017 Cameroon Hugo Broos (Belgium)
2019 Algeria Djamel Belmadi (Algeria)
2021 Senegal Aliou Cisse

This article was most recently revised and updated 6 months ago

Rababe Koussaimi, a 22-year-old journalist, is deeply passionate about the world of sports. She grew up in a footballing environment, supporting both Bayern Munich and Wydad Athletic Club. She began her English journalism career by hosting a podcast for the first English radio station in Morocco. Currently, the Moroccan journalist channels her enthusiasm into writing and conducting extensive research, creating insightful and engaging content for GoalBall Live readers.